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Finding the Right Type of Birth Control for You

Tu Cuerpo, Tu Salud, Tu Decisión to Use Birth Control

As a woman who lives in a mundo multicultural, you make choices – big and small – every day.

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You are brave and bold. Tu futuro is up to you.

As you continue to discover “what’s next” in your life, having a conversation about birth control options may be helpful.

Learn About Birth Control Options That May Be Available to You
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Are you confused about tus opciones? You’re not alone

Your sexual health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters related to your reproductive system – the parts of your body that help you have a baby.

It’s about ensuring you have a satisfying sex life, family planning options and the freedom to decide if children are in your future. 1, 2, 3

Birth control prevents pregnancy by interfering with ovulation and/or fertilization of the egg. When it comes to birth control, there are multiple methods you can choose from. Some forms of birth control contain hormones while others do not.

Here's some info about 3 options

Short-acting contraceptives

include pills, patches, rings and injections. Pills are taken orally, patches are placed on your skin, rings are inserted into your vagina, and injections are shots from a doctor or health care provider. Short-term options can be taken daily, weekly, monthly or every three months. You can stop using these methods at any time.4, 5

Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC)

includes intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants. An IUD is placed inside your body in your uterus and an implant is placed in your arm by a health care provider. They are used for multiple years. You can stop using these methods at any time and the removal should be performed by a doctor or health care provider.6, 7, 8

Permanent options

include sterilization – it is a permanent method of birth control in which the fallopian tubes are blocked or removed via surgery. These procedures prevent the egg from moving down the fallopian tube and keep the sperm from reaching the egg. They are not easily reversible.5, 9, 10

Find More Information on Short-Acting, Long-Acting Reversible, and Permanent Contraceptives
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Choosing birth control is muy personal and it is important to talk with a doctor or health care provider about which birth control option is right for you, keeping in mind your life stage and personal health background.

What’s Next?

"As a result of the pandemic, attitudes toward contraception changed with many women reconsidering what’s next in their lives and how birth control may play a role. Findings from a recent survey* showed that one-third of women said they are more careful about using contraception when they have sex because of the COVID-19 pandemic. This applies to 43% of the Hispanic population within the survey.11"

Dr. Erica Montes, a board-certified OBGYN and founder of The Modern Mujer Health Blog

*The Guttmacher Institute national internet-based survey was conducted from April 30-May 6, 2020 and analyzed 2,009 cisgender women 18-49 years of age who have ever engaged in penile-vaginal sex.

Dr. Erica Montes Discusses the Impact the Pandemic May Have Had On Some Women's Attitudes Towards Contraception
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Dr. Erica Montes, a board-certified OBGYN and founder of The Modern Mujer Health Blog

*The Guttmacher Institute national internet-based survey was conducted from April 30-May 6, 2020 and analyzed 2,009 cisgender women 18-49 years of age who have ever engaged in penile-vaginal sex.

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You're in Control, Take Acción

Schedule time with a doctor or health care provider either in-person or virtually to find the right birth control for you.

Here’s a list of questions to consider asking your doctor:

  • How does each method work to prevent pregnancy?
  • What considerations should I take into account when deciding which method may be right for me?
  • If I want to consider a non-daily contraceptive method, what type is right for me?
Schedule Time With Your Doctor In-Person or Virtually to Find the Right Birth Control Option for You
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Top

1. World Health Organization. (2019). Sexual Health. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/health-topics/sexual-health#tab=tab_2.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2019). Sexual health. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/sexualhealth/Default.html.

3. United Nations Population Fund. (2021). Sexual & reproductive health. Retrieved from https://www.unfpa.org/sexual-reproductive-health.

4. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (2021). Birth control – Short Acting Hormonal Methods. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/consumers/free-publications-women/birth-control#ShortActingHormonalMethods.

5. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. (2018). Birth control options: Things to consider. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/birth-control/in-depth/birth-control-options/art-20045571.

6. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). (2021). Long-Acting reversible Contraception (LARC): Intrauterine DEVICE (IUD) and implant. Retrieved from https://www.acog.org/womens-health/faqs/long-acting-reversible-contraception-iud-and-implant#:~:text=What%20are%20long%2Dacting%20reversible,and%20are%20easy%20to%20use.

7. American Sexual Health Association. (2021). Understanding LARC. Retrieved from http://www.ashasexualhealth.org/understanding-larc/.

8. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (2021). Birth control - Long-acting Reversible Contraceptives. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/consumers/free-publications-women/birth-control#LARC.

9. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). (2021). Sterilization for women and men. Retrieved from https://www.acog.org/womens-health/faqs/sterilization-for-women-and-men.

10. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (2021). Birth control – Permanent Methods. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/consumers/free-publications-women/birth-control#PermanentMethods.

11. Lindberg, L. D. et al. (2020). Early Impacts of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Guttmacher Survey of Reproductive Health Experiences. Guttmacher Institute. Retrieved from https://www.guttmacher.org/report/early-impacts-covid-19-pandemic-findings-2020-guttmacher-survey-reproductive-health.

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